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New Pagan Family Series

   

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Litha by Jodi Lee

Multi-format Ebook: via Smashwords, etc.
Kindle: via Amazon.com
Editor: Melanie Choly
Publisher: Self

Available titles through Smashwords, Kindle, Nook, Diesel and Kobo.




Creating New Pagan Family Traditions – Some time ago, the girls and I discussed working on a project together, one that had all the elements of pagan family life, centered around each Sabbat and then for fun – the moons as well.

We came up with the Creating New Pagan Family Traditions chapbook series.

Each chapbook will have Sabbat information, sample ritual, activity suggestions for kids, sample menu with recipes, crafts, youth-centered fiction and paper activities (coloring, picture search, etc.).

*note* It’s been brought to my attention that the activities are often not printable in several ebook formats, therefore I’ve set up a system here that will give access to those activities on download pages, password protected for each release. The Yule, Imbolc and Ostara activities are collected together on one page. If you purchased these chapbooks and can not print the activities, please get in touch using the contact form (attach e-receipt), and I’ll send you the password. From Beltaine on, the link and password will be included at the very end of the ebook.

My apologies for any inconveniences.

Chapbooks will be released one to two months ahead of actual Sabbat* between November 2011 and October 2012.

* Lughnasadh and Mabon were put on hold while we tried to fix a formatting error. They’ll be released along with Samhain in September.




What they’re saying about the Creating New Pagan Family Traditions series:

Carla C. on Yule & Litha: These are oh so delightful! Thoroughly researched and thought out with so many fun things and wonderful recipes. I love them! Thank you so much!

Heather L. on Ostara: I love the chapter books. my 10 year old read the ostara one. and we can’t wait till the next ones come out. an easy format for both parent and child….




Excerpt – Litha:

Also known as Midsummer, Summer Solstice and Alban Hefin, Litha generally falls in the third week of June, usually between the 17 and 23 of the month. It is the time of the longest day of the year – after this, each day becomes progressively shorter until Yule – the longest night of the year.

In Celtic mythology we see this represented as a battle between the dark and the light; Goronwy going to great lengths to murder Lugh, and steal away the love of the flower-bride, Blodeuwedd; the Oak King passing in favor of the Holly King; Mordred murdering his father/uncle, King Arthur, and Camelot fading into shadowy legend.

In warmer climes, it is indeed mid-summer, but for most of North America summer is only just beginning. It is a time to celebrate growth, new life, new challenges and the potential in everything.

Traditionally, this is a great time to harvest wild or cultivated young herbs to stock your magickal pantry. Young plants have a great energy, and are far more likely to recover quickly from a small harvesting. One must request the permission of the Goddess and of the spirit of the plant itself. Gently take hold of the plant or branch, and politely ask if the spirit will share its bounty. You’ll know, trust me, if you receive permission. A tingle of energy will enter you, just a small one. Take no more than a third of the plants offering; any more may kill the herb and insult the Goddess. Always leave a gift, such as a coin, a pebble, or even bread crumbs to feed the animals in return for what you have taken.

This is also a wonderful time to gather fresh water from a stream or spring. This water can be blessed and used to cleanse crystals and stones, create colored-water jars for healing and in any other water-based spells in the coming year. Again, leave a gift for the spirits of the water…they are particularly fond of shiny trinkets.

June is well known as the month for weddings in most spiritual sectors. For those on our path, it is often thought that in the past, young women found themselves carrying a child near to Litha after participating in the rites at Beltaine, emulating the God and Goddess’ Great Rite of Creation. Couples were then wed by handfasting, literally having their hands bound together with cloth or ribbons, which were then tied in knots. After the ceremony, the couple would carefully free themselves, without untying the knots, and often with great difficulty. The bindings were kept safe as long as the partners stayed together, generally for a year and a day (or other set amount of time) at which time they could chose to part or stay together.

Litha is the perfect time to re-dedicate oneself to the Goddess, offering your love and honor for the coming year. The youthful Sun God is honored, as is his pregnant wife. Fresh fruit, vegetables and breads all add to the celebration. The celebrations begin the evening before, with a bonfire built and lit ablaze at sunset. An all-night vigil and dawn ritual to welcome the Sun God’s ascension is a part of many traditions, not only the Celtic. Celebrations continue all day, ending only after a meal shared at dusk. Dancing, singing, games… all have become a part of the pagan Sabbat of Litha.




Where to buy:

Yule – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Imbolc – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Ostara – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Beltaine – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Litha – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Lughnasadh – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Mabon – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Samhain – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy

Esbats – Kindle | Smashwords | Diesel eBook Store | B&N | Kobo | Etsy